The Learning Center

Free Shipping on orders over $49 FREE SHIPPING on all orders

Six ways to naturally boost testosterone

Low Testosterone (T) can significantly affect your quality of life. Testosterone is the hormone that’s critical for a muscle strength, fat distribution, and a healthy sex drive. With aging some men can become deficient in this important hormone. It may present as fatigue, less interest in sex, and/or decrease in muscle mass. There are steps you can take to boost your testosterone naturally. Below are six natural ways to boost testosterone and help prevent any deficiencies.

Intense workouts: Research has shown the intense workouts like squats, push-ups, and pull-ups release higher levels of testosterone in the body. Testosterone levels are highest in the morning and start to go down during the day. Exercising in the evening will have a better impact on the testosterone level. Endurance exercises, like long distance running, can actually decrease testosterone. It can do this by increasing the size of the adrenal glands, which releases more cortisol. High cortisol levels lead to lower testosterone.

Eat healthy fats:Testosterone is a steroid hormone, which is made from cholesterol. A diet with sufficient amount of healthy fats will lead to higher testosterone levels. A fat intake of 25-40% of daily calories is ideal. A low fat, low calorie diet will have negative effects on testosterone levels. Foods with healthy fats include eggs, grass fed meat, oysters, salmon and avocado.

Maintain healthy weight:Higher body fat decreases testosterone and increases the body’s estrogen levels. Healthy weight is also important for heart health, good blood pressure, and preventing diabetes. Everyone has different body types and nutritional requirements. There is not one size fits all solution. For one person a BMI of 22 might be ideal and another might be happy at 27. Your own individual goals and perspective are important.

Meditation, deep breathing, andrelaxation: Whichever method you choose, it’s important for your body to relax and recover. One of the simplest ways is to close your eyes and focus on just your breathing. When you keep focus on your breathing and notice the air moving in and out, it helps to clear the mind and brings a feeling of calmness. When the body gets accustomed to relaxation then it reacts better to stress.

Fruits and vegetables:These foods have high antioxidant properties and can help your mood and libido. Pomegranate,broccoli, garlic, cauliflower and other green vegetables are good choices. Fruits can be eaten as snack and vegetables should be included with the meals. It’s important to find interesting ways of cooking vegetables. Some options include grilling, baking, sautéing, and roasting. My personal favorite is baking sweet peppers stuffed with Gorgonzola cheese.

Sleep:Testosterone levels rise during sleep and can decrease with poor sleep habits. A study published in the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA) looked at a small sample of healthy young men who underwent 1 week of sleep restriction to 5 hours per night. Their daytime testosterone levels decreased by 10-15%. A good night’s sleep is important for your overall health. Avoid caffeinated drinks or alcohol close to bedtime. Make sure the room temperature is not too hot or cold. A good night sleep will rejuvenate the body and give you a good start for the day.

By adding these natural solutions to your daily routines, you should see improvements in your testosterone levels in no time.

Shop natural herbs and adaptogen supplements in our online store

All of our products at Raydian Herbs are designed by a physician and pharmacist with the goal of enhancing lives. Our Calm Focus contains a combination of ashwagandha, rhodiola, and lemon balm to help with cognitive performance* and decrease fatigue*. You can shop Calm Focus now in our online store!

 

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2129168/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20300017

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21678033

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15831061

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/1029127